These are the resources and guidelines on best practices in K-12 environmental education. Use the filters on the left to refine your search. To start a new search, please de-select your previous choices by clicking the (-) buttons at the top.



The second edition of Natural Curiosity supports a stronger basic awareness of Indigenous perspectives and their importance to environmental education. The driving motivation for a second edition was the burning need, in the wake of strong and unequivocal recommendations by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, to situate Indigenous perspectives into the heart of Canadian educational settings and curricula, most notably in connection with environmental issues.

The Indigenous lens in this edition represents a cross-cultural encounter supporting what can become an ongoing dialogue and evolution of practice in environmental inquiry. Some important questions are raised that challenge us to think in very different ways about things as fundamental as the meaning of knowledge.

 

Le présent document est un excellent outil pour l’enseignante ou l’enseignant de même qu’un incitatif pour l’élève à découvrir le monde qui l’entoure. Dans cette deuxième édition de Curiosité naturelle, on découvre plus en détail l’apprentissage environnemental vu par les Autochtones. Avec cette découverte, on ne peut que remettre complètement en question la place que l’on occupe dans le monde. Le point de vue autochtone de cette édition donne le coup d’envoi d’un dialogue qui permet à l’enseignante ou à l’enseignant de découvrir la vision autochtone des choses et à l’élève de tisser des liens durables avec le monde naturel. Vous pouvez acheter le ressource ici.


As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on “a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert).

Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In a rich braid of reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return. (Milkweed.org)

 

Order Braiding Sweetgrass on Milkweed.orgAmazon or find it at the Calgary Public Library. See also this discussion guide suitable for high school students. 


The guide is written for teachers and includes both the basics of climate change science and perspectives on teaching a subject that has become socially and politically polarized (US based info but some good information). 


The NAAEE Guidelines for Excellence series is available for free download. Guidelines for Excellence include: Community Engagement, Early Childhood Environmental Education Programs, Nonformal Environmental Education Programs, Environmental Education Materials, K-12 Environmental Education, and Professional Development of Environmental Educators


Connecting the Dots focuses on learning strategies and the ways of organizing learning experiences; the “how to” of learning. These learning strategies involve students as engaged learners, learning within the context of their communities and addressing relevant, local issues.


Forest and Nature School in Canada: A Head, Heart, Hands Approach to Outdoor Learning is a resource focused on new approaches to nature-based learning


Guide to Education for Sustainability offers introductory tools, background, and examples to help educators of all grade levels and subject areas strengthen classroom curricula and community projects


Pathway to Stewardship is a framework providing a guide and roadmap towards stewardship. It covers every stage of a child's development using a series of benchmarks or goals. It is grounded in extensive research and interviews with 75 community leaders. Pathway to Stewardship is a call to action for everyone who plans for or spends time with children - parents, teachers, relatives, community groups, health professionals and government agencies.


Environmental Learning and Experience: An Interdisciplinary Guide for Teachers provides assistance to British Columbia teachers of all subjects and grades to integrate environmental concepts into teaching and learning. The Teaching and Learning Principles as well as the Principles for Conceptualizing ‘Environment’ can be applied in Alberta classrooms.


Education for a Sustainable Future: A Resource for Curriculum Developers, Teachers, and Administrators is intended to assist Manitoba curriculum developers and educators to integrate sustainability concepts into new and existing curricula. It is interdisciplinary in approach, and provides direction, that is relevant to Alberta educators, for the integration of sustainability knowledge, skills, values, and life practices within the curriculum, the classroom, and the community. 


Educating for Action is a Green Teacher Article providing a framework for thinking about the place of action in environmental education (William F. Hammond, from issue #50)