These are the resources and guidelines on best practices in K-12 environmental education. Use the filters on the left to refine your search. To start a new search, please de-select your previous choices by clicking the (-) buttons at the top.



Nature Play and Learning Places offers a set of guidelines for those that create, manage or promote development of nature spaces in the everyday environment of children, youth and families, especially in urban/suburban communities.


Grounds for Action by Bell, Anne C and Dyment, Janet (2006) found that children who experience school grounds with diverse natural settings are more physically active, more aware of nutrition, more civil to one another, and more creative.


Intergenerational Place-based Education by Mannion and Lynch (2010) found that environmental or place-based education that incorporates children and adults learning together improves intergenerational relations and individual, community, and ecological well being. Their research encourages schools to include intergenerational learning, contextualize curricula in the environment and embrace outdoor learning.


Back to School: Back Outside from the National Wildlife Federation documents how outdoor time boosts academic performance.


Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv coined the phrase ‘nature deficit disorder’ to describe the negative effects of children not spending time in nature. He brings forward the growing body of research indicating that direct exposure to nature is essential for healthy childhood development and for the physical and emotional health of children and adults.


Connecting Canadians with Nature: An Investment in the Well-Being of Our Citizens from the Canadian Parks Council is a report that provides an overview of the benefits of connecting with nature.


Environmental Outdoor Education and Exposure to Nature: The Positive Effects on Student Wellness and Academic Achievement is an annotated bibliography by Bill Bagshaw. It provides an extensive list of research on the effects of outdoor education on mental well-being, abilities and physical wellness.


Learning to Love the Natural World Enough to Protect is an article from Louise Chawla that makes the connection between early childhood experiences outdoors with a caring adult and environmental action later in life.