Environmental and Outdoor Education

Stories in the Schoolyard (K-4) invites students to step outside and find delight in the ordinary, wonderful ways nature's stories unfold right in their own schoolyard. This active place-responsive program will support students to foster a sense of belonging in nature at the same time as sparking their curiosity to learn more. In this program, we'll become better acquainted with that tree in the corner of the field that's almost been forgotten. We'll also follow along with the adventures of Gary the Goose as he finds courage in face of fear. Program includes: a puppet story, imaginative sensory play, Indigenous connections, group poetry writing, and lots of active movement.

We Can Too! (Gr. 2-4) invites students to notice how nature expresses itself in cycles. We will look for examples of natural cycles in the schoolyard and follow the adventures of Cate the Caterpillar as she transforms from caterpillar to butterfly. This program encourages students to develop a growth mindset and to discover their own unique gifts. Program includes: a puppet story, musical poetry, Indigenous connections, active movement, and a printable growth mindset resource. 

These notes contain highlights and link to the podcast episode. See more resources from Child & Nature Alliance here

These flashcards provide easy to follow one-pager activities for different seasons. 

Download PictureThis, simply take or upload a photo of any plant and get instantaneous plant ID results! The website also has a massive plant encyclopedia and catalogue. 

The Alberta Youth Leaders for Environmental Education created this climate policy resolution template with support from Schools for Climate Action. Use the template to pass a resolution with your environmental class or club, or student council using the instructions below. 

View the Template

 

Instructions for Using the Policy Template

  1. Download the template here.
  2. Review the template as a team which could be a school club, student council, and/or class with a teacher. Make a copy of it and change it to fit with your school community and local area, making it a message that you understand and are comfortable with. Discuss the changes as a group and ensure that everyone has a chance to contribute

  3. Pass and sign the resolution. Hold a vote with your whole team to pass it. Have all members sign the document (we recommend only signing your initials or first name if you are under 18) and date it. Have a chosen representative(s) sign the document with their contact email. Share a copy of your resolution, and if you’re comfortable with it, a photo with AYLEE by filling out this form.

  4. Action: Create an action plan to use your policy resolution. Include who you will share it with and how, and how you will ensure that your actions will uphold your resolutions.

  5. Follow up: Continue to check in as a team with your progress on the resolution. Share updates with AYLEE and other schools who are passing resolutions.

Note: If at any time of using the instructions for the policy template you have any questions or concerns regarding the steps, please feel free to contact AYLEE through our Youth Program Coordinator at shauna@abcee.org

 

Suggested Timeline 

  • Review: An estimate of a two weeks upon introduction of the policy template as a group, based on a group this time can be lengthened or shortened.
  • Pass and Sign: Set a date and time to hold a vote one week after the time of review.
  • Action: One to two weeks to finalize the action steps, however this is an ongoing process and does not need to be finalized.
  • Follow up: Throughout the use of the template, we encourage actively participating and keeping the resolution accountable through checking in with AYLEE and other schools. This is all dependent on your group's progress and capacity. 

In all, a timeline for using a policy template is flexible, but we believe it is helpful and important to have a timeline or a goal set by your group that you can work towards and change if need be.

Students of all ages will become engaged in Eco-Games in their schoolyards. They involve scavenger hunts, secret codes, ecological literacy and sparks for further inquiry and action. There are 15 Eco-Games available for FREE download. Watch the youtube videos to learn how to set up the Eco-Games. 

This resource library includes videos, podcasts, games, and activities. There are grade level recommendations and a brief description of the content of the resources. Topics include autonomous vehicles, biodiversity, carbon footprints, cities, climate change, environmental justice, food, material use, waste, personal transportation, renewable energy, residential buildings, and wastewater. 

This toolbox for climate education can be used in a variety of high school courses and university courses. The suite of resources includes assignments, discussion questions and prompts, and Ted Talk videos that pair well with the materials. 

A web resource containing a guide to culturally important Blackfoot plants by season. 

BioKits are interactive activity books that can be printed and taken with your class on any outing in the community or natural parks! Activities connect to the various sights and sounds of the community, including signs of wildlife, and encourage students to explore the services in their community and think about topics such as transportation/green transportation, recycling/waste services, and more!

 

BioKits are also available in French