Early Childhood (0-5)

These notes contain highlights and link to the podcast episode. See more resources from Child & Nature Alliance here

These flashcards provide easy to follow one-pager activities for different seasons. 

Download PictureThis, simply take or upload a photo of any plant and get instantaneous plant ID results! The website also has a massive plant encyclopedia and catalogue. 

Engage your students in Canadian Geographic Education's newest resource called Original Place Names in Arctic Lands. Check out this Story Map and accompanying learning activity that focuses on Canada's North and Inuit culture by exploring original place names. 

The next Story Map is Learning from the Land, which highlights some examples of how various Indigenous communities across Turtle Island are connected to the land in the different seasons.

Canada's Outdoor Learning Store sells a variety of book bundles, guides, and kits to aid educators in taking learning outdoors. Search the shop by seasons, themes, type, language, and age level. It is run as a social enterprise which allows them to provide a return for outdoor learning non-profit organizations from across the country, and beyond.

In the article Nature Can Be as Engaging as Video Games — How to Help Kids Fall in Love With the Outdoors, which also contains a TEDx video and useful linkes, Scott Sampson encourages parents to help kids fall in love with nature just like he did: through direct experience. He recommends three steps that we — along with the children in our lives — can take to connect with nature. You don’t need to go to a national park to help your kids fall in love with nature; a walk around the block can be enough. Tech also doesn’t have to be the enemy. Instead, use it as a tool to enhance their awe.

How to Make the Most of Indoor Play When You Can't Go Outside is an article with advice, activities, and links on how to bring environmental education into the indoors. This article provides tips on how to redefine what “outdoors” can really mean for each of us. For those who only have access to a backyard or are fully homebound, check out this resource for activities to maximize a small space or bring the outdoors in! 

The Children and Nature Network maintains a collection of free toolkits, reports, infographics and advocacy tools is designed to help connect children, families and communities to nature. 

Learn about the importance of learning with the land, led by Indigenous Peoples. Included are links to other great resources as well. 

This article describes easy-to-use tools and methods for finding and identifying different types of rocks and minerals in your backyard!