Grade 1

Inside Education offers free environmental & natural resource education in the form of grants, lesson plans, activities, videos, teacher guides, toolkits, classroom and field programs, youth summits, and professional development for all grade levels in a huge variety of topics and subject areas!

Climate Change and Me is designed for elementary school and also available in French. This video series covers a variety of topics including: Greenhouse effect, biomes and ecosystems, the hydrological cycle, the role of plants in the fight against climate change, sources of energy, and the waste cycle.

Students of all ages will become engaged in Eco-Games in their schoolyards. They involve scavenger hunts, secret codes, ecological literacy and sparks for further inquiry and action. There are 15 Eco-Games available for FREE download. Watch the youtube videos to learn how to set up the Eco-Games. 

Engage your students in Canadian Geographic Education's newest resource called Original Place Names in Arctic Lands. Check out this Story Map and accompanying learning activity that focuses on Canada's North and Inuit culture by exploring original place names. 

The next Story Map is Learning from the Land, which highlights some examples of how various Indigenous communities across Turtle Island are connected to the land in the different seasons.

This resource, created by Beverly Owens, links to the research of some amazing scientists!

This resource library includes videos, podcasts, games, and activities. There are grade level recommendations and a brief description of the content of the resources. Topics include autonomous vehicles, biodiversity, carbon footprints, cities, climate change, environmental justice, food, material use, waste, personal transportation, renewable energy, residential buildings, and wastewater. 

A web resource containing a guide to culturally important Blackfoot plants by season. 

Canada's Outdoor Learning Store sells a variety of book bundles, guides, and kits to aid educators in taking learning outdoors. Search the shop by seasons, themes, type, language, and age level. It is run as a social enterprise which allows them to provide a return for outdoor learning non-profit organizations from across the country, and beyond.

Add your class to the Junior Water Walkers! Use the activity ideas in the four pillars: Connect, Reflect, Respect, and Protect, and then commit to protecting a local water source near your school. Check out the book The Water Walker by Joanne Robertson, and sign up to receive a Water Box for your own class copy of the book and journal to act as a "time capsule" of your learning, to then pass on to a new class at the end of the year. 

In the article Nature Can Be as Engaging as Video Games — How to Help Kids Fall in Love With the Outdoors, which also contains a TEDx video and useful linkes, Scott Sampson encourages parents to help kids fall in love with nature just like he did: through direct experience. He recommends three steps that we — along with the children in our lives — can take to connect with nature. You don’t need to go to a national park to help your kids fall in love with nature; a walk around the block can be enough. Tech also doesn’t have to be the enemy. Instead, use it as a tool to enhance their awe.