Grade 1

Project WET provides water education in the form of activity booklets, storybooks, educators guides, maps and posters, and activity kits.  

Located near Hinton, William A. Switzer Provincial Park provides field trip programs and in-class presentations for Grades K-6. Topics include wetlands, forests, art, animals, and bugs. 

The interactive, inquiry-based programs at the Jurassic Forest and Learning Centre will take students and teachers back in time to discover prehistoric flora and fauna, while highlighting the beauty and diversity of the modern forest ecosystem. The educational programs at Jurassic Forest were designed to meet Alberta Curriculum science and social studies targets for Grades 1-7. 

The Healthy Rivers Story Map is an interactive website that allows you to connect with and learn about Calgary’s watersheds, rivers and riparian areas, and explore actions you can take to protect the health of our rivers.

Some highlights include:

  • Information about the health of Calgary’s rivers, and ongoing monitoring activities
  • An interactive tool to learn about your local Calgary watershed
  • A map showcasing various City and community restoration and bioengineering projects
  • Volunteer and stewardship notice board, for citizens to find ways to get involved in their watershed

The guide is written for teachers and includes both the basics of climate change science and perspectives on teaching a subject that has become socially and politically polarized (US based info but some good information). 

The Columbia Basin Environmental Education Network links to a wide range of climate change resources for all grade levels. 

The Canadian Energy Museum offers school tours with programs aimed at different grade levels. You can also download program kits on geology and energy topics. The kits come complete with lesson plans, curriculum links, powerpoint presentations, videos, and activities.​

Located at 50339 AB-60, Leduc County.

Lessons created by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) and organized by grade clusters. 

Exploring By The Seat Of Your Pants aims to inspire the next generation of scientists, explorers and conservationists. We do this by bringing science, exploration, adventure and conservation into classrooms through virtual speakers and field trips with leading experts across the globe. Since starting in September 2015 we've run well over 1,000 live events and connected hundreds of thousands of students to scientists and explorers in over 60 countries. Best part of all, it is and always will be 100% free for classrooms everywhere! 

Each month during the school year we host 25+ Google Hangout events for classrooms. 
 

As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on “a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert).

Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In a rich braid of reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return. (Milkweed.org)

 

Order Braiding Sweetgrass on Milkweed.orgAmazon or find it at the Calgary Public Library. See also this discussion guide suitable for high school students.