Grade 6

Exploring By The Seat Of Your Pants aims to inspire the next generation of scientists, explorers and conservationists. We do this by bringing science, exploration, adventure and conservation into classrooms through virtual speakers and field trips with leading experts across the globe. Since starting in September 2015 we've run well over 1,000 live events and connected hundreds of thousands of students to scientists and explorers in over 60 countries. Best part of all, it is and always will be 100% free for classrooms everywhere! 

Each month during the school year we host 25+ Google Hangout events for classrooms. 
 

Pl@ntNet is an app to help to identify plants with pictures. It makes it very easy and fun to identify plant species anywhere in the world! 

The guide focuses specifically on how to help engage First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) youth to take action to create change on an issue they care about, and how to respectfully incorporate FNMI knowledge and culture into your classroom or program. The Action Process has been designed to utilize and honour FNMI ways of knowing. We believe that this is integral to the creation of sustainable communities.

Part One of this guide provides information to help you develop a respectful understanding of FNMI people, culture and knowledge. Much of the information presented in these sections is geared toward readers who are not First Nations, Métis or Inuit, but who work with students/youth who are FNMI. For this reason, some of the information in this section of the guide may not be of as much benefit to FNMI readers who may already have a better understanding of the concepts discussed.

Part Two of this guide will be of benefit to all readers as it provides a detailed overview of an action process as well as activities to support each step in the design and implementation of your action projects. This section also includes suggestions for ways to develop a respectful understanding of FNMI knowledge with your students/youth participants and ways to incorporate traditional FNMI knowledge into your action project.

As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on “a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert).

Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In a rich braid of reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return. (Milkweed.org)

 

Order Braiding Sweetgrass on Milkweed.orgAmazon or find it at the Calgary Public Library

Yale Climate Connections provides current articles and radio stories from around the globe about the impacts of climate change and what people are doing about it. Articles are written at a level that students can understand. 

Energy Illustrated is a web series featuring short videos that clearly illustrate and explain current trends related to energy efficiency, renewables, and electric cars. 

Emerging Leaders for Solar Energy (ELSE), in collaboration with The Critical Thinking Consortium (TC²), created the Shining Light on Solar Energy resource to support educators and learners in developing energy and climate literacy using critical inquiry and a multidisciplinary approach.

With twenty-four lessons divided into Division One through Four, this resource explores the roles that solar power might play in providing sustainable energy for our vehicles, homes, schools, and communities. This resource has been designed to nurture the competencies required for scientific thinking and critical inquiry, with a focus on using critical thinking to deepen conceptual and subject-area understanding.

Each fully-developed lesson includes teaching notes, briefing sheets, image sets, activity sheets, and assessment materials to support student thinking and learning about solar energy.

Nobel Peace Prize nominee Greta Thunberg helped launch an initiative by school-aged children to boycott school in response to the climate crisis.  She's made headlines this year through her uncompromising - and uncomfortable! - presentation to the United Nations' COP24 Climate Change conference in Poland and to numerous world leaders since then.  For Greta, it's as simple as this: climate change is a threat to our survival, and the world is not doing enough about it. Each Friday since August 2018, Greta has missed school to go on strike outside of the Swedish Parliament Building. She is demanding change and has encouraged kids around the world to do the same until world leaders take serious action to reduce emissions and fulfill the mandates of the Paris Agreement. 

Check out this 5 minute video of Greta speaking. Show this to your students, and ask them:

Do you agree with Greta's point of view?
Do you think her admission to being on the autism spectrum was an effective strategy?
What are the pros and cons of boycotting school?
What should students - and adults - be doing about the changing climate?
Do you think her presentation to the UN was effective?

The Leg Up Foundation Education Program, in partnership with Nutrien, presents the GROWING THE NEXT GENERATION© School Tours Education Program. The school tours program features highly interactive sessions geared toward the grades 4-6 curriculum that focus on agriculture, wetland ecosystems, horse anatomy, horse health and welfare, equine history and the importance of bees to our ecosystem.

Programs take place in May and June each year.

The EMEND 360 video tours and interactive 360 photos uses a research site located near Peace River, AB, to help students explore the boreal forest and sustainable forestry practices. Lesson plans, student workbooks, and guiding questions are included.

Another fantastic 360 virtual experience is offered by NAIT. These interactive tours allow users to explore various environments to discover what common boreal wetland and forest types look like, as well as learn about how wildfire and prescribed burn events affect these systems. If you are using a smart device, select the compass in the top right-hand corner to enable 3D orientation mode.

The Virtual Walk in the Forest Tours are a collaboration between NAIT Centre for Boreal Research and Fuse Consulting Ltd., with contributions from the Government of Alberta, the EMEND project, and various generous photographers.