Kindergarten

The Into Nature guide from Back to Nature Network contains helpful tips on how to start an outdoor education program in your teaching. The second half features dozens of activities (beginning on page 24). More detailed lesson plans begin on page 51.

Scroll down to Resources for Teachers to download your free guides today!

The Nature For All Discovery Zone is a searchable database of videos, lesson plans, comic books, and colouring books to help connect people with nature, instill a love of nature, and learn about nature wherever you are. The database also features guidebooks with tips for organizations on how to introduce young learners to nature and encourage more people to get outdoors!

The Learn at Home resources topics include oceans, biodiversity, mapping, citizen science, extreme weather, energy efficiency, agriculture, and more!

Green Calgary has created lesson plans and activities in a variety of subject areas and topics, including waste, recycling, biodiversity, citizen science, energy, stormwater, climate change, and vermicomposting. Activities explore science, math and language arts in nature, as well as art. 

Climatescience.org provides online courses, books for children, powerpoint presentations, and lesson plans! All created and vetted by experts in the field of climate change science.

View projects by youth across Canada and submit your project. 

Benefits of becoming part of the Bee City Canada community:

  • Fabulous inspiration for Inquiry-based and STEM learning.
  • Connecting with other Bee City Canada Schools across Canada.
  • Creating an outdoor classroom.
  • Creation of a beautiful pollinator garden.
  • Mentorship of the community about pollinators and how everyone can help them.
  • Sharing of resources, events and activities on the beecitycanada.org website.
  • Increasing the celebration potential of events and programs.
  • A stronger connection to Nature.
  • Engage the entire school with an identity.
  • Weaving the arts into the pollinator education program.

This toolkit supports practitioners who encourage children’s outdoor play. It takes a balanced approach to risk and safety. The toolkit was created it because of growing concerns that children are overprotected when playing outdoors or stopped from going outside altogether. As a result, they miss out on the joy and sense of adventure they should have from playing outside, and lose out on the long-term benefits of outdoor play.