Lesson Plans

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and the BC Teachers’ Federation have teamed up to create free classroom-ready materials that help students engage with the two great inconvenient truths of our time: climate change and rising inequality. And we don’t stop at small-scale personal choices, climate justice looks to how we can re-imagine the systems around us to make a better life for everyone. 

Solar in the Schools provides 10 free lessons complete with videos, readings, quizzes exercises and discussion forums. The lessons are written at the high school level with lessons in energy efficiency, solar thermal, solar electric, wind, microhydro, renewable energy in the developing world and the economics of renewable energy. Climate change resources can also be found on the webpage. 

 

The Canadian Energy Museum offers school tours with programs aimed at different grade levels. You can also download program kits on geology and energy topics. The kits come complete with lesson plans, curriculum links, powerpoint presentations, videos, and activities.​

Located at 50339 AB-60, Leduc County.

Lessons created by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) and organized by grade clusters. 

A series of six lesson plans: three of these include student lab activities and the other three cover the basics of solar cells and solar electric systems. 

 

Lesson Plan for Gr 5-8

This module was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy to teach about the energy from the sun, the energy needs of students in the classroom and, nation-wide energy needs. Includes a lab experiment, worksheets and pre- and post- tests.

Video for Gr 8-12

An introduction showing how a PV panel converts the energy of the sun into renewable electricity to power homes and businesses.

 

This Grade 4 inquiry was developed in collaboration with the Kainai Board of Education and Galileo Educational Network. The webpage includes curricular connections, information, examples, and instructions for using the web resource. Linked on the main page is the Kainai Plant Index. 

As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take us on “a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert).

Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In a rich braid of reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return. (Milkweed.org)

 

Order Braiding Sweetgrass on Milkweed.orgAmazon or find it at the Calgary Public Library. See also this discussion guide suitable for high school students. 

The second edition of Natural Curiosity supports a stronger basic awareness of Indigenous perspectives and their importance to environmental education. The driving motivation for a second edition was the burning need, in the wake of strong and unequivocal recommendations by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, to situate Indigenous perspectives into the heart of Canadian educational settings and curricula, most notably in connection with environmental issues.

The Indigenous lens in this edition represents a cross-cultural encounter supporting what can become an ongoing dialogue and evolution of practice in environmental inquiry. Some important questions are raised that challenge us to think in very different ways about things as fundamental as the meaning of knowledge.

 

Le présent document est un excellent outil pour l’enseignante ou l’enseignant de même qu’un incitatif pour l’élève à découvrir le monde qui l’entoure. Dans cette deuxième édition de Curiosité naturelle, on découvre plus en détail l’apprentissage environnemental vu par les Autochtones. Avec cette découverte, on ne peut que remettre complètement en question la place que l’on occupe dans le monde. Le point de vue autochtone de cette édition donne le coup d’envoi d’un dialogue qui permet à l’enseignante ou à l’enseignant de découvrir la vision autochtone des choses et à l’élève de tisser des liens durables avec le monde naturel. Vous pouvez acheter le ressource ici.

Emerging Leaders for Solar Energy (ELSE), in collaboration with The Critical Thinking Consortium (TC²), created the Shining Light on Solar Energy resource to support educators and learners in developing energy and climate literacy using critical inquiry and a multidisciplinary approach.

With twenty-four lessons divided into Division One through Four, this resource explores the roles that solar power might play in providing sustainable energy for our vehicles, homes, schools, and communities. This resource has been designed to nurture the competencies required for scientific thinking and critical inquiry, with a focus on using critical thinking to deepen conceptual and subject-area understanding.

Each fully-developed lesson includes teaching notes, briefing sheets, image sets, activity sheets, and assessment materials to support student thinking and learning about solar energy.