Websites & Web Activities

The Ecohappiness Project focuses on the intersection of nature and mental health, tying together all the science and practical tools to help families live a happy, balanced life through nature. The website includes articles on outdoor activities and getting kids outside, and recommendations for books and resources.

There are two Ecohappiness Project books:

Students of all ages will become engaged in Eco-Games in their schoolyards. They involve scavenger hunts, secret codes, ecological literacy and sparks for further inquiry and action. There are 15 Eco-Games available for FREE download. Watch the youtube videos to learn how to set up the Eco-Games. 

Engage your students in Canadian Geographic Education's newest resource called Original Place Names in Arctic Lands. Check out this Story Map and accompanying learning activity that focuses on Canada's North and Inuit culture by exploring original place names. 

The next Story Map is Learning from the Land, which highlights some examples of how various Indigenous communities across Turtle Island are connected to the land in the different seasons.

This resource, created by Beverly Owens, links to the research of some amazing scientists!

This resource library includes videos, podcasts, games, and activities. There are grade level recommendations and a brief description of the content of the resources. Topics include autonomous vehicles, biodiversity, carbon footprints, cities, climate change, environmental justice, food, material use, waste, personal transportation, renewable energy, residential buildings, and wastewater. 

Cranky Uncle uses cartoons, humour, games, and activities to teach students about critical thinking and how to recognize misinformation. See also the videos explaining the resource and the damaging impact of climate misinformation. 

A web resource containing a guide to culturally important Blackfoot plants by season. 

The Alberta Youth Leaders for Environmental Education (AYLEE) Green Leaders Kit has been created by youth for youth across Alberta so that they can work toward a more sustainable future by making real change. Explore our suggestions for planning a climate related event, having climate conversations, and how you can make a meaningful difference by taking action. This kit is designed to be versatile and applicable in a variety of climate driven endeavours, so everyone is included. That's why we've curated resources to help us structure this toolkit into four of the most important parts of a climate movement: Learning & Getting Involved, Hosting an Event, Having Climate Conversations, and Taking Action.

Access the Kit at: https://www.ayleegreenleaderskit.com/

In the article Nature Can Be as Engaging as Video Games — How to Help Kids Fall in Love With the Outdoors, which also contains a TEDx video and useful linkes, Scott Sampson encourages parents to help kids fall in love with nature just like he did: through direct experience. He recommends three steps that we — along with the children in our lives — can take to connect with nature. You don’t need to go to a national park to help your kids fall in love with nature; a walk around the block can be enough. Tech also doesn’t have to be the enemy. Instead, use it as a tool to enhance their awe.

How to Make the Most of Indoor Play When You Can't Go Outside is an article with advice, activities, and links on how to bring environmental education into the indoors. This article provides tips on how to redefine what “outdoors” can really mean for each of us. For those who only have access to a backyard or are fully homebound, check out this resource for activities to maximize a small space or bring the outdoors in!