Outdoor Learning

BioKits are interactive activity books that can be printed and taken with your class on any outing in the community or natural parks! Activities connect to the various sights and sounds of the community, including signs of wildlife, and encourage students to explore the services in their community and think about topics such as transportation/green transportation, recycling/waste services, and more!

 

BioKits are also available in French

Canada's Outdoor Learning Store has many book bundles, guides, and kits to aid educators in bringing Indigenous perspectives to their outdoor education. 

In the article Nature Can Be as Engaging as Video Games — How to Help Kids Fall in Love With the Outdoors, which also contains a TEDx video and useful linkes, Scott Sampson encourages parents to help kids fall in love with nature just like he did: through direct experience. He recommends three steps that we — along with the children in our lives — can take to connect with nature. You don’t need to go to a national park to help your kids fall in love with nature; a walk around the block can be enough. Tech also doesn’t have to be the enemy. Instead, use it as a tool to enhance their awe.

How to Make the Most of Indoor Play When You Can't Go Outside is an article with advice, activities, and links on how to bring environmental education into the indoors. This article provides tips on how to redefine what “outdoors” can really mean for each of us. For those who only have access to a backyard or are fully homebound, check out this resource for activities to maximize a small space or bring the outdoors in! 

Learning Inside Out is a seven-week course of activities curated from the LSF's Resources4Rethinking database, with themes from the Step Outside Nature Guides and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which cover everything from climate change to equity. Different activities are listed for different age groups from K-12.

Learn about the importance of learning with the land, led by Indigenous Peoples. Included are links to other great resources as well. 

This article describes easy-to-use tools and methods for finding and identifying different types of rocks and minerals in your backyard!

Ever Active Schools uses the Comprehensive School Health framework to support schools, providing professional development opportunities, lesson plans and other resources, and an EAS in residence program to help schools develop a custom plan for improving school health.

The Into Nature guide from Back to Nature Network contains helpful tips on how to start an outdoor education program in your teaching. The second half features dozens of activities (beginning on page 24). More detailed lesson plans begin on page 51.

This guide to nature journaling from Project Learning Tree introduces ways you can integrate journaling to your teaching in a variety of subject areas.